The Sleep Parametric EEG Automated Recognition System – revolutionizing EEGs

Source: newsweek.com

Every time you blink, think or move, your brain generates electricity as individual neurons in the skull transmit information needed to make it happen. If we could detect the electrical signals produced by individual neurons, we could, in theory, read a person’s mind.

Amazing. And exceedingly difficult.

 

Read more here: http://www.newsweek.com/2016/04/15/human-brain-eeg-technology-neuroscience-443368.html

Research regarding Music Learning with the Help of BCI

Source: tuftsdaily.com

Computer Science Ph.D. candidate Beste Filiz Yuksel and her colleagues have found a new learning method for playing the piano – one that can read your brain as you learn. While the BACh system, or Brain Automated Chorales system, works specifically with learning how to play the piano, the team aims to better understand how computer systems and music can affect rates of learning in general.

Those working alongside Yuksel include her advisor, Professor Rob Jacob, Ph.D., Tufts graduate Kurt Oleson (E ’15) and others.

 

Read more here: http://tuftsdaily.com/features/2016/03/13/the-piano-lesson-of-tomorrow-comp-sci-dept-researches-music-learning/

Monkeys learn how to steer Wheelchairs with their Thoughts

Source: kurzweilai.net

Duke Health neuroscientists have developed a brain-machine interface (BMI) that allows monkeys to steer a robotic wheelchair with their thoughts.

The BMI uses signals from hundreds of neurons recorded simultaneously in two regions of the monkeys’ brains that are involved in movement and sensation. As the animals think about moving toward their goal — in this case, a bowl containing fresh grapes — computers translate their brain activity into real-time operation of the wheelchair.
Read more here: http://www.kurzweilai.net/monkeys-learn-to-drive-wheelchairs-with-their-thoughts?utm_source=KurzweilAI+Daily+Newsletter&utm_campaign=65aa013839-UA-946742-1&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_6de721fb33-65aa013839-282045470

Thought-controlled prosthetic Limbs and Devices may soon be available

Source: reuters.com

Thought-controlled prosthetic limbs, wheelchairs and computers may be available within a decade, say Australian scientists who are planning to conduct human trials next year on a high-tech implant that can pick up and transmit signals from the brain.

Animals have already been tested with the device, called a stentrode, which is the size of a matchstick and planted inside a blood vessel near the brain.

It uses a web of small electrodes to pick up neuron signals from the brain and converts them into electrical commands that may one day, the scientists hope, allow paralyzed patients to control a bionic limb or wheelchair.

 

Read more here: http://www.reuters.com/article/us-australia-bionic-idUSKCN0VW13T

Controlling our DIY Projects with our Minds?

Source: popsci.com

Pressing buttons with your hands is a drag. With OpenBCI, an open-source brain-computer interface, you can use your mind to control smartphones, robots, and even your friends’ limbs.

When DARPA funded research into a brain-computer interface, artist and engineer Joel Murphy and his former student Conor Russomanno built a working prototype. Then they decided to further refine the device in order to make the software and hardware cheap and accessible.

 

Read more here: http://www.popsci.com/control-your-projects-with-your-mind

Neurofeedback Therapy for brain-related Disorders

Source: dnaindia.com

HEG Neurofeedback therapy is a combination of 21st-century science and technology.

Mind Care and Management Associates (MCMA) recently organised a workshop in Mumbai on mental health titled ‘Hemoencephalography (HEG) Neurofeedback as evidence-based Therapeutic Intervention’. The workshop was held on the occasion of the company’s second anniversary on February 7, 2016, in Santacruz to create more awareness among people.

 

Read more here: http://www.dnaindia.com/health/report-understanding-impact-of-neurofeedback-therapy-on-brain-related-disorders-2179405

The first time a paraplegic walks by brain control: “I think and then I walk”

Source: ocregister.com

After a motorcycle crash paralyzed his legs, Adam Fritz never stopped thinking he would walk again.

Those very thoughts, aided by new technology, activated a first-of-its-kind experiment in which Fritz’s brain waves enabled him to walk a 12-foot course inside a UC Irvine research lab.

The 29-year-old insurance claims adjuster spent countless hours thinking about walking so that his brain waves could be recorded.

 

Read more here: http://www.ocregister.com/articles/fritz-704284-walk-brain.html

Mistakes of the Brain can provide Insight for Human and Machine Learning

Source: thetartan.org

Brain-machine interfaces are devices that allow their subjects to control external devices using only their thoughts. Using these interfaces, a team of researchers at Carnegie Mellon has found that the brain makes mistakes because its conception of the world isn’t always an accurate depiction of how the world really works.

The project primarily focuses on the process of learning while using a brain-machine interface.

 

Read more here: http://thetartan.org/2016/2/15/scitech/mistakes

27 Years After a Brain Injury, a Violinist is making Music again.

Source: thedailybeast.com

The clock reads 4 a.m. as the distant sound of loud voices shouting “Tell me your name!” steadily becomes clearer. Soon, the curtain is pulled back, revealing three doctors who have come to test your neurologic function.

After several tense minutes filled with a barrage of tests and questions, the doctors depart. You’re left remembering the events leading up to your hospital admission, as you feel the stitches running along the side of your head. Rinse and repeat.

 

Read more here: http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2016/02/09/science-brought-her-music-back-to-life-27-years-after-a-brain-injury.html

Brain Implants with Thin-Film Wireless Power Transmission System

Source: kurzweilai.net

A research team at Toyohashi University of Technology in Japan has fabricated an implanted wireless power transmission (WPT) device to deliver power to an implanted neural interface system, such as a brain-computer interface (BCI) device.

Described in an open-access paper in Sensors journal, the system avoids having to connect an implanted device to an external power source via wires through a hole in the skull, which can cause infections through the opening and risk of infection and leakage of the cerebrospinal fluid during long-term measurement. The system also allows for free-moving subjects, allowing for more natural behavior in experiments.

 

Read more here: http://www.kurzweilai.net/powering-brain-implants-without-wires-with-thin-film-wireless-power-transmission-system?utm_source=KurzweilAI+Daily+Newsletter&utm_campaign=0703504b19-UA-946742-1&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_6de721fb33-0703504b19-282045470