Neurofeedback Therapy for brain-related Disorders

Source: dnaindia.com

HEG Neurofeedback therapy is a combination of 21st-century science and technology.

Mind Care and Management Associates (MCMA) recently organised a workshop in Mumbai on mental health titled ‘Hemoencephalography (HEG) Neurofeedback as evidence-based Therapeutic Intervention’. The workshop was held on the occasion of the company’s second anniversary on February 7, 2016, in Santacruz to create more awareness among people.

 

Read more here: http://www.dnaindia.com/health/report-understanding-impact-of-neurofeedback-therapy-on-brain-related-disorders-2179405

Mind-Controlled Prostetic Fingers can now move individually

Source: inverse.com

Throughout human history, the hand has been irreplaceable — prostheses, as clever as they were, couldn’t match nerves, bones, and sinew. As robotics improve, actuators and metal do a decent thumb-and-index impression. On the other hand, robotic fingers on a prosthetic hand generally clench in unison, which is great if you’re trying to catch a ball, but less so if you want to hold a pen or pick up earphones.

Read more here: https://www.inverse.com/article/11639-mind-controlled-prosthetic-robot-arm-waggles-fingers-for-first-time


The first time a paraplegic walks by brain control: “I think and then I walk”

Source: ocregister.com

After a motorcycle crash paralyzed his legs, Adam Fritz never stopped thinking he would walk again.

Those very thoughts, aided by new technology, activated a first-of-its-kind experiment in which Fritz’s brain waves enabled him to walk a 12-foot course inside a UC Irvine research lab.

The 29-year-old insurance claims adjuster spent countless hours thinking about walking so that his brain waves could be recorded.

 

Read more here: http://www.ocregister.com/articles/fritz-704284-walk-brain.html

How disabled Musicians can make Music with their Minds

Source: discovermagazine.com

A piece of music, composed in a fashion like no other before it, will be played later this month at the Peninsula Arts Contemporary Music Festival in the United Kingdom.

The piece, entitled “Activating Memory,” is the result of a decade-long project by researchers at Plymouth University and the Royal Hospital for Neuro-disability. Four musicians, who are unable to speak or walk, used electrical signals from their brain to select musical passages while musicians played their selections in real-time. The researchers’ brain-computer interface allowed the quartet to express their musical creativity without singing or picking up an instrument.

 

Read more here: http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/d-brief/2016/02/15/disabled-musicians-make-music-with-their-minds/#.VspA–a2HFk

First “Cybathlon” to happen October 2016 in Switzerland

Source: geekwire.com

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Imagine a contest for the kinds of technologies that would set Tony Stark’s nuclear-powered heart all aflutter in the “Iron Man” movies: exoskeletons, brain-computer interfaces, stair-climbing wheelchairs and bionic limbs, for example.

You don’t have to imagine it anymore: Swiss organizers are getting ready for the first-ever Cybathlon on Oct. 8 in Zurich.

Read more here: http://www.geekwire.com/2016/cybathlon-turns-an-olympic-style-spotlight-on-exoskeletons-and-mind-control/

Mistakes of the Brain can provide Insight for Human and Machine Learning

Source: thetartan.org

Brain-machine interfaces are devices that allow their subjects to control external devices using only their thoughts. Using these interfaces, a team of researchers at Carnegie Mellon has found that the brain makes mistakes because its conception of the world isn’t always an accurate depiction of how the world really works.

The project primarily focuses on the process of learning while using a brain-machine interface.

 

Read more here: http://thetartan.org/2016/2/15/scitech/mistakes

27 Years After a Brain Injury, a Violinist is making Music again.

Source: thedailybeast.com

The clock reads 4 a.m. as the distant sound of loud voices shouting “Tell me your name!” steadily becomes clearer. Soon, the curtain is pulled back, revealing three doctors who have come to test your neurologic function.

After several tense minutes filled with a barrage of tests and questions, the doctors depart. You’re left remembering the events leading up to your hospital admission, as you feel the stitches running along the side of your head. Rinse and repeat.

 

Read more here: http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2016/02/09/science-brought-her-music-back-to-life-27-years-after-a-brain-injury.html

‘Bionic spinal cord’: Stroke Patients might soon walk again with a mind-controlled Exoskeleton

Source: dailymail.co.uk

More than 15 million people suffer strokes worldwide each year, with a third of victims left permanently disabled.

However, there is fresh hope for those left paralysed after researchers developed what they have called a ‘bionic spinal cord’

The bionic cord consists of a paperclip-sized implant that lets wearers control an exoskeleton with just the power of thought.

Read more here: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-3437375/Bionic-spinal-cord-help-stroke-victims-walk-Brain-implant-lets-patients-control-exoskeleton-using-MIND.html

See also: Wakefield Express – Bionic implant ‘could enable the paralysed to walk again’

Brain Implants with Thin-Film Wireless Power Transmission System

Source: kurzweilai.net

A research team at Toyohashi University of Technology in Japan has fabricated an implanted wireless power transmission (WPT) device to deliver power to an implanted neural interface system, such as a brain-computer interface (BCI) device.

Described in an open-access paper in Sensors journal, the system avoids having to connect an implanted device to an external power source via wires through a hole in the skull, which can cause infections through the opening and risk of infection and leakage of the cerebrospinal fluid during long-term measurement. The system also allows for free-moving subjects, allowing for more natural behavior in experiments.

 

Read more here: http://www.kurzweilai.net/powering-brain-implants-without-wires-with-thin-film-wireless-power-transmission-system?utm_source=KurzweilAI+Daily+Newsletter&utm_campaign=0703504b19-UA-946742-1&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_6de721fb33-0703504b19-282045470

US Government seeks High-Fidelity BCI

Source: technologyreview.com

Konrad Kording has seen the future of neuroscience and he finds it depressing.

Read more here: https://www.technologyreview.com/s/600686/government-seeks-high-fidelity-brain-computer-interface/